compulsivetraveler.tv [BETA]

The ultimate travel video site

İstanbul, Turkey Travel Video

Bosphorus Cruise

In which the tour group cruises the Bosphorus from Istanbul towards the Black Sea.

The Bosphorus is the world's narrowest strait, separating Europe from Asia. It connects the Black Sea to the Sea of Marmara (connected by the Dardanelles to the Aegean Sea, and thereby to the Mediterranean).

filmmaker: Blennylips

country: Turkey

channel: arts & culture

rating: PRO

views: 11954

comments: 0

Add to Favorites Add a comment Plan-it!

Leave your comment!


(we will not share this)

(hint: you are human)

See all videos of Turkey...

Sheep Dog in Turkey

Sheep Dog in Turkey

Ran into a mean sheep dog outside Gokyurt, Turkey. www.frakesproductions.com

Ephesus, Turkey. A Unesco city

Ephesus, Turkey. A Unesco city

Ephesus was an ancient Greek city, and later a major Roman city, on the west c…moreEphesus was an ancient Greek city, and later a major Roman city, on the west coast of Asia Minor, near present-day Selçuk, Izmir Province. It was one of the twelve cities of the Ionian League during the Classical Greek era. In the Roman period, Ephesus had a population of more than 250,000 in the 1st century BC, which also made it one of the largest cities in the Mediterranean world. The city was famed for the Temple of Artemis (completed around 550 BC), one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Emperor Constantine I rebuilt much of the city and erected new public baths. Following the Edict of Thessalonica from emperor Theodosius I, the temple was destroyed in 401 AD by a mob led by St. John Chrysostom. The town was partially destroyed by an earthquake in 614 AD. Ephesus was one of the seven churches of Asia that are cited in the Book of Revelation. The Gospel of John may have been written here. The city was the site of several 5th century Christian Councils, see Council of Ephesus. It is also the site of a large gladiators' graveyard. Ephesus has been estimated to be in the range of 400,000 to 500,000 inhabitants in the year 100, making it the largest city in Roman Asia and of the day. Ephesus was at its peak during the 1st and 2nd century AD. The city was famed for the Temple of Artemis (Diana),[21] who had her chief shrine there, the Library of Celsus, and its theatre, which was capable of holding 25,000 spectators.[22] This open-air theater was used initially for drama, but during later Roman times gladiatorial combats were also held on its stage, with the first archaeological evidence of a gladiator graveyard found in May 2007.[23] The population of Ephesus also had several major bath complexes, built at various points while the city was under Roman rule. The city had one of the most advanced aqueduct systems in the ancient world, with multiple aqueducts of various sizes to supply different areas of the city, including 4 major aqueducts. They fed a multiple set of water mills, one of which has been identified as a sawmill for marble. Ephesus is a Unesco World Heritage Site. less

Bodrum

Bodrum

Bodrum is a port city, in the southwestern Aegean Region of Turkey. It is loca…moreBodrum is a port city, in the southwestern Aegean Region of Turkey. It is located on the southern coast of Bodrum Peninsula, .It has a vibrant tourist economy and the harbour is an international yachting center. The city was called Halicarnassus of Caria in ancient times and was famous for housing the Mausoleum of Mausolus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Bodrum Castle, built by the Crusaders in the 15th century, overlooks the harbour and the marina. less

Istanbul

Istanbul

Istanbul biggest draw remains its historic center, partially listed as a UNESCO…moreIstanbul biggest draw remains its historic center, partially listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Sultan Ahmed Mosque is popularly known as the Blue Mosque for the blue tiles adorning the walls of its interior. It was built from 1609 to 1616, during the rule of Ahmed I. Like many other mosques, it also comprises a tomb of the founder, a madrasah and a hospice. At its lower levels and at every pier, the interior of the mosque is lined with more than 20,000 handmade ceramic tiles in more than fifty different tulip designs. Dolmabahçe Palace, located in the Beşiktaş district on the European coastline of the Bosphorus strait, served as the main administrative center of the Ottoman Empire from 1856 to 1922, Hagia Sophia is a former Orthodox patriarchal basilica, later a mosque, and now a museum. From the date of its dedication in 360 until 1453, it served as the Greek Patriarchal cathedral of Constantinople, except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire. The building was a mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931, when it was secularized. It was opened as a museum on 1 February 1935. Topkapi Palace was the Sultan's residence during Ottoman's times. Construction began in 1459, ordered by Sultan Mehmed II, the conqueror of Byzantine Constantinople. The palace complex consists of four main courtyards and many smaller buildings. At its peak, the palace was home to as many as 4,000 people, The Spice Bazaar, or Egyptian Bazaar is one of the largest bazaars in the city. Located in Fatih, in the neighborhood of Eminönü and is the second largest covered shopping complex after the Grand Bazaar. The building itself is part of the külliye of Yeni Mosque, and rents from the shops within was intended to help pay for the upkeep of the mosque. The structure was designed by the chief court architect Koca Kasım Ağa, but completed by architect Mustafa in 1660. less

See all videos of arts & culture...

Jamie's Journey:Damnernsaduak floating markets

Jamie's Journey:Damnernsaduak floating markets

Jamie Logan, Cruise Director of the Regent's World Cruise explores the floating…moreJamie Logan, Cruise Director of the Regent's World Cruise explores the floating markets outside Bangkok less

Jerusalem : Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Jerusalem : Church of the Holy Sepulchre

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, or the Church of the Resurrection by Eastern …moreThe Church of the Holy Sepulchre, or the Church of the Resurrection by Eastern Christians, is a church within the Christian Quarter of the walled Old City of Jerusalem. The site is venerated as Golgotha (the Hill of Calvary), where Jesus was crucified, and is said also to contain the place where Jesus was buried (the Sepulchre). The church has been a paramount – and for many Christians the most important – pilgrimage destination since at least the 4th century, as the purported site of the resurrection of Jesus. Today it also serves as the headquarters of the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, while control of the building is shared between several Christian churches and secular entities in complicated arrangements essentially unchanged for centuries. Today, the church is home to Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism. Anglican and Protestant Christians have no permanent presence in the church and some regard the alternative Garden Tomb, elsewhere in Jerusalem, as the true place of Jesus's crucifixion and resurrection. On the south side of the altar is a stairway climbing to Calvary (Golgotha), traditionally regarded as the site of Jesus' crucifixion and the most lavishly decorated part of the church. The main altar there belongs to the Greek Orthodox, which contains The Rock of Calvary (12th Station of the Cross). The rock can be seen under glass on both sides of the altar, and beneath the altar there is a hole said to be the place where the cross was raised. Due to the significance of this, it is the most visited site in the Holy Sepulchre. The Roman Catholics (Franciscans) have an altar to the side, The Chapel of the Nailing of the Cross (11th Station of the Cross). On the left of the altar, towards the Eastern Orthodox chapel, there is a statue of Mary, believed to be working wonders (the 13th Station of the Cross, where Jesus' body was removed from the cross and given to his family). Beneath the Calvary and the two chapels there, on the main floor, there is The Chapel of Adam. According to tradition, Jesus was crucified over the place where Adam's skull was buried. The Rock of Calvary is seen cracked through a window on the altar wall, the crack traditionally being said to be caused by the earthquake that occurred when Jesus died on the cross, and being said by more critical scholars to be the result of quarrying against a natural flaw in the rock. Just inside the entrance is The Stone of Anointing, also known as The Stone of Unction, which tradition claims to be the spot where Jesus' body was prepared for burial by Joseph of Arimathea. However, this tradition is only attested since the crusader era, and the present stone was only added in the 1810 reconstruction. The Rotunda is located beneath the larger of the church's two domes. In the centre of the Rotunda is the chapel called The Edicule, which contains the Holy Sepulchre itself. The Edicule has two rooms. The first one holds The Angel's Stone, a fragment of the stone believed to have sealed the tomb after Jesus' burial. The second one is the tomb itself. Under the status quo, the Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Armenian Apostolic Churches all have rights to the interior of the tomb. The church is a UNESCO World Heritage site. less

Venice pidgeons outnumber tourists

Venice pidgeons outnumber tourists

St Mark's Square is the principal public square of Venice, Italy, where it is …more St Mark's Square is the principal public square of Venice, Italy, where it is generally known just as "the Piazza". The Piazzetta (the 'little Piazza') is an extension of the Piazza towards the lagoon in its south east corner. The two spaces together form the social, religious and political centre of Venice. It is one of the few great urban spaces in Europe where human voices and the cooing of pidgeons prevail over the sounds of motorized traffic. Venice and its lagoons are a Unesco World Heritage Site. less

See all videos by Blennylips...

 Bonaire Dive Log: Sabadeco Pier

Bonaire Dive Log: Sabadeco Pier

This is our "House dive". For six months or so, we had the privilege of seeing …moreThis is our "House dive". For six months or so, we had the privilege of seeing this Frogfish (named "eduardina" by my nephew) nearly every dive. She is the most active Frogfish I've ever seen! Also lots of Boga action, including cleaning behavior. less

Bonaire Dive Log: Bari Reef

Bonaire Dive Log: Bari Reef

Blennylips Bonaire dive log video. Sand Dollar house reef. Tour led by the inc…moreBlennylips Bonaire dive log video. Sand Dollar house reef. Tour led by the incomparable Bill & Prawphan. This is the E-ticket dive tour! Amazing collection of critters on this reef. Highlights were turtles, seahorse, and a frogfish. less

Bonaire Dive Log: Hilma Hooker

Bonaire Dive Log: Hilma Hooker

Blennylips Bonaire dive log video. Bonaire's most famous and accessible wreck d…moreBlennylips Bonaire dive log video. Bonaire's most famous and accessible wreck dive. Usually pretty crowded, but not too many this time. Can count on Tarpon and schooling Jacks with a nice reef to decompress on on the way back to shore. less