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09400 Kusadasi, Turkey Travel Video

Kusadaci on Turkey's Emerald Coast

The port city of Kusadasi, located along the Turquoise Coast, is home to beautiful beaches and Roman ruins such as the ones found in nearby Ephesus .

The Roman Empire took possession of the
coast in the 2nd century BC and made it their provincial capital and in the early years of Christianity. St John the Evangelist and (according to Roman Catholic sacred tradition) Mary (mother of Jesus) both came to live in the area.
Kusadaci is a reknown center of carpet weaving.

filmmaker: CompulsiveTraveler

country: Turkey

channel: arts & culture

rating: PRO

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